NASA’s NICER finds X-ray boosts in the Crab Pulsar’s radio bursts

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A global science collaboration using data from NASA’s Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) telescope on the International Space Station has discovered X-ray surges accompanying radio bursts from the pulsar in the Crab Nebula. The finding shows that these bursts, … Read More

More than 5,000 tons of extraterrestrial dust fall to Earth each year

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Every year, our planet encounters dust from comets and asteroids. These interplanetary dust particles pass through our atmosphere and give rise to shooting stars. Some of them reach the ground in the form of micrometeorites. An international program conducted for … Read More

Mars didn’t dry up in one go

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The Perseverance rover has just landed on Mars. Meanwhile, its precursor Curiosity continues to explore the base of Mount Sharp (officially Aeolis Mons), a mountain several kilometres high at the centre of the Gale crater. Using the telescope on the … Read More

Corals carefully organize proteins to form rock-hard skeletons: Scientists’ findings suggest corals will withstand climate change

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Charles Darwin, the British naturalist who championed the theory of evolution, noted that corals form far-reaching structures, largely made of limestone, that surround tropical islands. He didn’t know how they performed this feat. Now, Rutgers scientists have shown that coral … Read More

Why our brains miss opportunities to improve through subtraction: Researchers explain the human tendency to make change through addition

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In a new paper featured on the cover of Nature, University of Virginia researchers explain why people rarely look at a situation, object or idea that needs improving — in all kinds of contexts — and think to remove something … Read More

Neanderthal ancestry identifies oldest modern human genome

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In an article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, an international team of researchers analyses the genome of an almost complete skull first discovered in Zlatý Kůň, Czechia in the early 1950s and now stored in the National Museum in … Read More

From stardust to pale blue dot: Carbon’s interstellar journey to Earth

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We are made of stardust, the saying goes, and a pair of studies including University of Michigan research finds that may be more true than we previously thought. The first study, led by U-M researcher Jie (Jackie) Li and published … Read More

Kirigami-style fabrication may enable new 3D nanostructures

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A new technique that mimics the ancient Japanese art of kirigami may offer an easier way to fabricate complex 3D nanostructures for use in electronics, manufacturing and health care. Kirigami enhances the Japanese artform of origami, which involves folding paper … Read More

Evidence of Antarctic glacier’s tipping point confirmed

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Researchers have confirmed for the first time that Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica could cross tipping points, leading to a rapid and irreversible retreat which would have significant consequences for global sea level. Pine Island Glacier is a region … Read More

A new state of light: Physicists observe new phase in Bose-Einstein condensate of light particles

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A single “super photon” made up of many thousands of individual light particles: About ten years ago, researchers at the University of Bonn produced such an extreme aggregate state for the first time and presented a completely new light source. … Read More

Mice with hallucination-like behaviors reveal insight into psychotic illness: Study in mice and people offers new approach to investigating mental illnesses

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The humble lab mouse has provided invaluable clues to understanding diseases ranging from cancer to diabetes to COVID-19. But when it comes to psychiatric conditions, the lab mouse has been sidelined, its rodent mind considered too different from that of … Read More

How brain cells repair their DNA reveals ‘hot spots’ of aging and disease

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Neurons lack the ability to replicate their DNA, so they’re constantly working to repair damage to their genome. Now, a new study by Salk scientists finds that these repairs are not random, but instead focus on protecting certain genetic “hot … Read More

Why some cancer drugs may be ineffective

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A possible explanation for why many cancer drugs that kill tumor cells in mouse models won’t work in human trials has been found by researchers with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Biomedical Informatics … Read More

African elephants’ range is just 17 percent of what it could be

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A study reported in the journal Current Biology on April 1 has both good news and bad news for the future of African elephants. While about 18 million square kilometers of Africa — an area bigger than the whole of … Read More

450-million-year-old sea creatures had a leg up on breathing: First evidence of trilobites’ bizarre breathing organs uncovered

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A new study has found the first evidence of sophisticated breathing organs in 450-million-year-old sea creatures. Contrary to previous thought, trilobites were leg breathers, with structures resembling gills hanging off their thighs. Trilobites were a group of marine animals with … Read More

Sugar not so nice for your child’s brain development, study suggests: New research shows how high consumption affects learning, memory

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Sugar practically screams from the shelves of your grocery store, especially those products marketed to kids. Children are the highest consumers of added sugar, even as high-sugar diets have been linked to health effects like obesity and heart disease and … Read More

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