First X-rays from Uranus discovered

|

Astronomers have detected X-rays from Uranus for the first time, using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. This result may help scientists learn more about this enigmatic ice giant planet in our solar system. Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun … Read More

Photosynthesis could be as old as life itself

|

Researchers find that the earliest bacteria had the tools to perform a crucial step in photosynthesis, changing how we think life evolved on Earth. The finding also challenges expectations for how life might have evolved on other planets. The evolution … Read More

How humans develop larger brains than other apes

|

A new study is the first to identify how human brains grow much larger, with three times as many neurons, compared with chimpanzee and gorilla brains. The study, led by researchers at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular … Read More

Older than expected: Teeth reveal the origin of the tiger shark

|

With a total length of up to 5.5m, the tiger shark is one of the largest predatory sharks known today. This shark is a cosmopolitan species occurring in all oceans worldwide. It is characterized by a striped pattern on its … Read More

Cephalopods: Older than was thought? Fossil find from Canada could rewrite the evolutionary history of invertebrate organisms

|

The possibly oldest cephalopods in the earth’s history stem from the Avalon Peninsula in Newfoundland (Canada). They were discovered by earth scientists from Heidelberg University. The 522 million-year-old fossils could turn out to be the first known form of these … Read More

‘Zombie’ genes? Research shows some genes come to life in the brain after death: Post-mortem changes may shed light on important brain studies

|

In the hours after we die, certain cells in the human brain are still active. Some cells even increase their activity and grow to gargantuan proportions, according to new research from the University of Illinois Chicago. In a newly published … Read More

Penguin hemoglobin evolved to meet oxygen demands of diving: Experiments on ancient proteins reveal evolution of better oxygen capture, release

|

Call it the evolutionary march of the penguins. More than 50 million years ago, the lovable tuxedoed birds began leaving their avian relatives at the shoreline by waddling to the water’s edge and taking a dive in the pursuit of … Read More

Tropical species are moving northward in U.S. as winters warm: Insects, reptiles, fish and plants migrating north as winter freezes in South become less frequent

|

Notwithstanding last month’s cold snap in Texas and Louisiana, climate change is leading to warmer winter weather throughout the southern U.S., creating a golden opportunity for many tropical plants and animals to move north, according to a new study appearing … Read More

Novel coronavirus circulated undetected months before first COVID-19 cases in Wuhan, China: Study dates emergence to as early as October 2019; Simulations suggest in most cases zoonotic viruses die out naturally before causing a pandemic

|

Using molecular dating tools and epidemiological simulations, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at the University of Arizona and Illumina, Inc., estimate that the SARS-CoV-2 virus was likely circulating undetected for at most two … Read More

Giraffes: The trouble with being tall

|

The giraffe is a truly puzzling animal. With its exceptional anatomy and suite of evolutionary adaptations, the giraffe is an outstanding case of animal evolution and physiology. Now, an international team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Northwestern … Read More

Lightning strikes played a vital role in life’s origins on Earth

|

Lightning strikes were just as important as meteorites in creating the perfect conditions for life to emerge on Earth, geologists say. Minerals delivered to Earth in meteorites more than 4 billion years ago have long been advocated as key ingredients … Read More

What happened to Mars’s water? It is still trapped there: New data challenges the long-held theory that all of Mars’s water escaped into space

|

Billions of years ago, the Red Planet was far more blue; according to evidence still found on the surface, abundant water flowed across Mars and forming pools, lakes, and deep oceans. The question, then, is where did all that water … Read More

How hummingbirds hum: New measurement technique unravels what gives hummingbird wings their characteristic sound

|

The hummingbird is named after its pleasant humming sound when it hovers in front of flowers to feed. But only now has it become clear how the wing generates the hummingbird’s namesake sound when it is beating rapidly at 40 … Read More

Scientists stunned to discover plants beneath mile-deep Greenland ice: Long-lost ice core provides direct evidence that giant ice sheet melted off within the last million years and is highly vulnerable to a warming climate

|

In 1966, US Army scientists drilled down through nearly a mile of ice in northwestern Greenland — and pulled up a fifteen-foot-long tube of dirt from the bottom. Then this frozen sediment was lost in a freezer for decades. It … Read More

Eye color genetics not so simple, study finds

|

The genetics of human eye colour is much more complex than previously thought, according to a new study published today. An international team of researchers led by King’s College London and Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam have identified 50 new … Read More

I ain’t afraid of no ghosts: People with mind-blindness not so easily spooked: The link between mental imagery and emotions may be closer than we thought

|

People with aphantasia — that is, the inability to visualise mental images — are harder to spook with scary stories, a new UNSW Sydney study shows. The study, published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, tested how aphantasic … Read More

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
%d bloggers like this: