Troops Disengaged But Not Withdrawn, China’s LAC Build-Up Worries India
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Troops Disengaged But Not Withdrawn, China’s LAC Build-Up Worries India

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Tanks pull back from the banks of Pangong Tso lake, in Ladakh along the India-China border

The Chinese want Indian Army to move out soldiers deployed after the May 5, 2020, standoff which began with clashes at Finger 4 on the north bank of Pangong Tso

NEW DELHI: Disengagement from Gogra (Patrolling Point 17 A) at Line of Actual Control in Eastern Ladakh has not changed troop deployment in the vicinity.

What worries Indian Army is the permanent construction of infrastructure on the Chinese side of the LAC.

“Both sides have moved back troops but there is no decrease in the number of troops in the vicinity,” said a source.

Bigger worry is the construction of infrastructure, habitat and defences, the source added. Indian Army had said on August 6 that disengagement was carried out and troops of both sides had moved back to their permanent bases.

Another source said the Chinese have troops with equipment all along the Western Highway.

“Their troops are at a distance of 150 km from Depsang, 100 km from Chushul and 60 km from Demchok.” India has maintained that only after complete disengagement, de-escalation will begin.

There have been major parlays to sort this out. And this time, the number of contentious locations along the LAC in Ladakh has increased.

The Chinese want Indian Army to move out soldiers deployed after the May 5, 2020, standoff which began with clashes at Finger 4 on the north bank of Pangong Tso.

It spread to multiple points including Hot Spring, Gogra, Galwan and Depsang.

Disengagement has taken place from Galwan (Patrolling Point 14), both banks of Pangong Tso and Gogra (PP 17A). The standoff continues at Depsang Bulge (PPs 10, 11, 11A, 12 & 13) along around 972 sq km on both sides.

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