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DJI’s new Mic 2 wireless microphone comes with Bluetooth, 32-bit float backup recordings and a dial

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DJI’s new Mic 2 wireless microphone comes with Bluetooth, 32-bit float backup recordings and a dial



This morning, DJI announced the Mic 2, the sequel to its first wireless microphone system released back in 2022. We were fans of the original, especially the details of its interface and user experience, and the Mic 2 expands on that with some additional creature comforts and a new transparent design.

Like the original, the Mic 2’s receiver unit has an onboard OLED screen to see and modify settings, but the Mic 2 ups the ante by slightly increasing its size and including a physical dial.

But you don’t actually need a receiver this time around because Mic 2 transmitters can pair directly to a smartphone or other capable devices directly via Bluetooth, with some caveats. Only one transmitter can be connected at a time, and Bluetooth connection disables some of the Mic 2’s new software features like AI noise canceling.

Other improvements include higher-quality 32-bit float internal recording to serve as a backup to the recording on your camera, and upgrades to the charging case included with the two-transmitter bundle, which now packs 18 hours of additional charge, three hours more than the original version.

DJI Mic 2: Elevating Professional Audio Recording Excellence
with Unparalleled Quality, User-Centric Design, and Exceptional Stability

Jan 17, 2024 – DJI, the global leader in civilian drones and innovative camera technology, today announced the launch of the new DJI Mic 2, setting a new benchmark in audio recording solutions. With DJI Mic 2, creators can expect an exceptional experience, marked by high-quality recording functions, user-friendly designs, and remarkable stability.

“DJI Mic 2 represents a leap forward in audio recording technology. We’ve combined high-quality recording functions, user-friendly designs, and noteworthy stability to empower content creators with the tools they need to capture extraordinary audio, no matter where their creativity takes them,” said Paul Pan, Senior Product Line Manager at DJI.

Pro Audio Recording Functions in Pocket-Size

At the heart of DJI Mic 2 lies the promise of capturing brilliance in different sounds. It’s equipped with omnidirectional recording capabilities, thoughtfully optimized for vocal clarity, ensuring that the audio content of users shines in various scenarios. Whether content creators are producing engaging vlogs, conducting insightful interviews, or recording in diverse environments, DJI Mic 2 guarantees that their audio is of high quality.

DJI Mic 2 also features intelligent noise-canceling technology[1], a game-changer for content creators working in bustling urban areas or crowded rooms. This innovative feature effectively reduces environmental noise, delivering clear vocals and uninterrupted audio recordings. Regarding windy or fast-moving scenarios, DJI Mic 2 has included windscreen to lower wind noise, ensuring clean sound capture in windy outdoor scenarios.

As an added layer of protection for the user’s audio, DJI Mic 2 offers the Safety Track feature. It allows content creators to record a second track at -6dB alongside the primary audio track, safeguarding against unexpected audio level spikes. Even in the midst of audibly complicated environments such as rock concerts, DJI Mic 2 delivers balanced results with remarkable ease.

User-Friendly Design for a Seamless and Intuitive Experience

DJI Mic 2 is not just developed with technical advancement, but also designed with users in mind. Its sleek and smart aesthetic is elevated by a premium metal charging case that not only has a minimalistic appearance but also offers a newly added locking latch, which provides a secure and reliable solution to prevent accidental drops for peace of mind during use.

To suit the style and preferences of different users, DJI Mic 2 is available in two transmitter colors: Shadow Black and Pearl White[2]. Shadow Black adds a discreet, high-tech appearance to the Mic 2 setup, while Pearl White offers an elegant alternative for those seeking a light-tone colorway.

When it comes to getting started, DJI Mic 2 simplifies the process. The system is ready to use anytime, anywhere. Users can just open the charging case, and DJI Mic 2 will then spring to life, automatically pairing the receiver and transmitters while charging them. Additionally, DJI Mic 2 can be seamlessly connected to DJI Osmo Action 4, DJI Osmo Pocket 3 and smartphone devices[3] via Bluetooth, while also offering hassle-free compatibility with various recording devices through USB-C, Lightning Adapters, as well as 3.5mm TRS analog output.

DJI Mic 2 also puts control at the fingertips of the user with its effortless touchscreen operation. A 1.1-inch OLED touchscreen paired with a precision dial provides quick access to critical information. Content creators will be able to adjust volume, gain, brightness, and more with ease, achieving the optimal audio setup smoothly.

With magnetic attachment for quick concealment, the transmitters feature a user-friendly clip-on design that simplifies the process of attaching them to clothing. DJI Mic 2 even offers dual-channel recording, allowing content creators to capture audio from two sources simultaneously, simplifying multi-source recording and enhancing efficiency during post-production.

To further expand the creative horizons of the user, DJI offers practical accessories[4] such as the DJI Lavalier Mic and DJI Mic 2 Charging Case.

Stability and Reliability in Every Recording

Stability is a hallmark of DJI Mic 2, ensuring that the audio recordings of the user are consistently outstanding. DJI Mic 2 is equipped with 8GB of internal storage per transmitter, offering up to 14 hours of uncompressed 48kHz 24-bit audio recording[5]. This ensures that content creators can record for extended periods without worrying about storage constraints.

DJI Mic 2 stands out significantly due to its cutting-edge 32-bit float internal recording[6] capability. This feature not only delivers high-quality recording but also adapts seamlessly to complex sound environments, capturing nuances of sounds, from quiet whispers to booming decibel levels. This level of flexibility provides greater reliability in erratic noise scenarios and offers more options for post-production fine-tuning.

When it comes to range and battery life, DJI Mic 2 shines. It offers an impressive maximum audio transmission range of up to 250 meters[7] (820 ft.) in open, unobstructed environments without interference. This range caters to common scenarios such as live streaming, studio recording, and outdoor recording. Plus, each transmitter and receiver has a remarkable 6-hour operating time[8], which can be extended to a generous 18 hours with the charging case, making it perfect for extended content creation sessions.

Price and Availability

The DJI Mic 2 is available to order from store.dji.com and authorized retail partners, with shipping starting today, in the following configurations:

The DJI Mic 2 (2 TX + 1 RX + Charging Case) retails for $349, and includes a DJI Mic 2 Receiver, two DJI Mic 2 Transmitters (Shadow Black), a DJI Mic 2 Charging Case, DJI Mic 2 Camera Audio Cable (3.5mm TRS), a DJI Mic 2 Mobile Phone Adapter (Type-C), a DJI Mic 2 Mobile Phone Adapter (Lightning), two DJI Mic 2 Windscreens, two DJI Mic 2 Clip Magnets, a DJI Mic USB-C Charging Cable and a DJI Mic 2 Carrying Bag.

The DJI Mic 2 (1 TX + 1 RX) retails for $219, and includes a DJI Mic 2 Receiver, a DJI Mic 2 Transmitter (Shadow Black), a DJI Mic 2 Camera Audio Cable (3.5mm TRS), a DJI Mic 2 Mobile Phone Adapter (Type-C), a DJI Mic 2 Mobile Phone Adapter (Lightning), a DJI Mic 2 Windscreen, a DJI Mic 2 Clip Magnet, a DJI Mic Splitter Charging Cable, and a DJI Mic 2 Carrying Pouch. The DJI Mic 2 Transmitter (Shadow Black) and DJI Mic 2 Transmitter (Pearl White) can also be purchased separately at $99 each. The DJI Lavalier Mic retails at $39 and DJI Mic 2 Charging Case retails at $69.


[1] Intelligent noise canceling of DJI Mic 2 cannot be enabled when the transmitter is connected to a smartphone via Bluetooth.

[2] Both the DJI Mic 2 (2 TX + 1 RX + Charging Case) combo and the DJI Mic 2 (1 TX + 1 RX) combo come with transmitter(s) in Shadow Black. DJI Mic 2 Transmitter (Pearl White) is sold separately.

[3] The transmitter needs to be worked with third-party video recording software when connected to smartphones via Bluetooth. For more details on compatibility, refer to the product page on the official DJI website.

[4] Sold separately.

[5] Each transmitter has 8 GB of internal storage to store up to 14 hours of uncompressed 48kHz 24-bit audio.

[6] Internal recording of DJI Mic 2 cannot be used when the transmitter is connected to a smartphone via Bluetooth.

[7] Measured with FCC compliance in an unobstructed environment without interference (160 m under CE). This data is for reference only. Actual transmission distance may vary depending on the environment.

[8] Tested with both transmitters connected to the receiver, without backup recording, and the receiver connected to a camera with the Camera Audio Cable (3.5mm TRS).



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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


We’d never before seen so much silicon wrapped up in such a small package

Photo: Samuel Spencer

The Hasselblad X1D beat Fujifilm to the market by three months in 2016 to become the first mirrorless medium format camera. It wasn’t the first “affordable” (or, at least, sub-$10,000) medium format option: that credit goes to Pentax and its 645D and Z, but it was the first larger-than-full-frame digital camera to be designed as a self-contained ILC with no mirror.

It was built around the same 50MP CMOS sensor as the 645Z, which also underpinned the Fujifilm GFX 50 models, producing some excellent image quality. Hasselblad’s modern minimalist design was eye-catching, and the operability improved significantly through a series of firmware updates (though it never offered the mass-market slickness of the GFX models).

One of the factors that allowed the Hasselblad to be so small was the decision to build leaf shutters into all the XCD lenses, rather than having a physical shutter in the camera body. This resulted in a camera that could sync with flashes all the way up to each lens’s maximum shutter speed. Though this came at the cost both of higher lens prices and of polygonal bokeh, as the shutter/aperture mechanisms had relatively few blades. This second issue was somewhat resolved by an update that allowed the aperture to be opened a fraction beyond the widest listed value, so that the blades don’t intrude on the image.

Click here to see the nearly 200 photos we’ve published from the X1D

Alongside the X1D came the first series of medium format lenses designed specifically for 44x33mm digital, giving some excellent results (to the point that moiré is a significant risk even when stopped-down to F5.6, given the lack of low-pass filter on the X1D’s sensor). It also led to the only instance we’ve seen of a manufacturer referring to equivalent f-numbers. It’s probably no surprise that it would be one of the only companies to solely produce larger than full-frame systems.

We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


We’d never before seen so much silicon wrapped up in such a small package

Photo: Samuel Spencer

The Hasselblad X1D beat Fujifilm to the market by three months in 2016 to become the first mirrorless medium format camera. It wasn’t the first “affordable” (or, at least, sub-$10,000) medium format option: that credit goes to Pentax and its 645D and Z, but it was the first larger-than-full-frame digital camera to be designed as a self-contained ILC with no mirror.

It was built around the same 50MP CMOS sensor as the 645Z, which also underpinned the Fujifilm GFX 50 models, producing some excellent image quality. Hasselblad’s modern minimalist design was eye-catching, and the operability improved significantly through a series of firmware updates (though it never offered the mass-market slickness of the GFX models).

One of the factors that allowed the Hasselblad to be so small was the decision to build leaf shutters into all the XCD lenses, rather than having a physical shutter in the camera body. This resulted in a camera that could sync with flashes all the way up to each lens’s maximum shutter speed. Though this came at the cost both of higher lens prices and of polygonal bokeh, as the shutter/aperture mechanisms had relatively few blades. This second issue was somewhat resolved by an update that allowed the aperture to be opened a fraction beyond the widest listed value, so that the blades don’t intrude on the image.

Click here to see the nearly 200 photos we’ve published from the X1D

Alongside the X1D came the first series of medium format lenses designed specifically for 44x33mm digital, giving some excellent results (to the point that moiré is a significant risk even when stopped-down to F5.6, given the lack of low-pass filter on the X1D’s sensor). It also led to the only instance we’ve seen of a manufacturer referring to equivalent f-numbers. It’s probably no surprise that it would be one of the only companies to solely produce larger than full-frame systems.

We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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Our favorite ‘natural worlds’ pictures: DPReview Editors’ Challenge results

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Our favorite ‘natural worlds’ pictures: DPReview Editors’ Challenge results


June includes multiple days devoted to celebrating nature, including World Environment Day (June 5), World Oceans Day (June 8) and World Rainforest Day (June 22). In that spirit, we chose ‘Natural Worlds’ as the theme for our most recent Editors’ Choice photo challenge, with over 100 readers submitting entries.

We love seeing your work! Thanks to everyone who submitted. We couldn’t call out every image we liked, so we restrained ourselves to a baker’s dozen (in no particular order).

If you don’t see your work here today, don’t despair. We’ll soon announce a new Editors’ Choice challenge.

Also, a quick reminder to keep comments constructive and civil. These are images submitted by your fellow readers who took the time to share their work. Rule #1: Be nice. That’s it, there is no rule #2.



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