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Hubble scientists revisit an incredible image of Veil Nebula, showing off new details

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Hubble scientists revisit an incredible image of Veil Nebula, showing off new details

In 2015, the Hubble Space Telescope captured an image of the Veil Nebula. NASA has revisited this image and applied new processing techniques, bringing out even finer details of the nebula.

NASA, ESA/Hubble and Z. Levay have been able to bring out additional details in the ionized gas that makes up the threads and filaments of the nebula. Observations taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 instrument using five different filters were combined with new post-processing methods to create the new image. You can see enhanced details of emissions from doubly ionized oxygen (seen in the image as blue colors), ionized hydrogen, ionized sulfur (green) and ionized nitrogen (seen as reds in the photo).

This close-up image of the Veil Nebula was first captured in 2015. It has been reprocessed to show a better view of the nebula and its filaments of ionized gas. The ionized gas is all that remains of a supernova that about 20 times the mass of the Sun. ‘The fast-moving blast wave from the ancient explosion is plowing into a wall of cool, denser interstellar gas, emitting light. The nebula lies along the edge of a large bubble of low-density gas that was blown into space by the dying star prior to its self-detonation.’ Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Z. Levay

The Veil Nebula is about 2,100 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Cygnus, otherwise known as the ‘Swan.’ As NASA writes, in astronomical terms, Cygnus is a relatively close neighbor.

100% crop of the above image. To download the massive image for yourself

Astronomer William Herschel first identified the Veil Nebula way back in 1784. In 1904, Herschel’s work was followed by Williamina Fleming’s discovery of a fainter portion of the nebula, known as Pickering’s Triangle, named after the director of the Harvard College Observatory where Fleming worked. If you’d like to view the Veil Nebula for yourself, the best observation time is early autumn in the northern hemisphere and early spring in the southern hemisphere. The nebula is not visible to the naked eye, but it can be seen through a telescope or binoculars under dark sky conditions. If you have a nebula filter, it will help brighten the Veil’s appearance and allow you to see additional detail.

The Veil Nebula is a visible portion of the Cygnus Loop, which is the remnant of a supernova formed about 10,000 years ago. The Veil Nebula formed through the death of a massive star, which possessed roughly 20 times the mass of the Sun. Like other stars of that size, it had a relatively short lifespan and died with a massive release of energy. The energy and debris from this supernova form the Veil Nebula’s tendrils of ionized gas.

The 2015 version of the image of the Veil Nebula. Image credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team

The original image and the reprocessed version show only a small section of the Veil Nebula, which is continually expanding. The entire nebula is 110 light-years across, covering about six full moons’ worth of the night sky as viewed from Earth. The section we see in the shot from Hubble, which is a six-image composite, is about two light-years across.

Back in 2015, when showing off its new image of the Veil Nebula, NASA also shared a couple of neat videos. The videos haven’t been redone with the latest processed image, but they’re nonetheless worth checking out again.

You can learn more about the Veil Nebula by visiting Hubble’s Caldwell catalog. For further reading on some of Hubble’s amazing images and discoveries, check out some of our prior coverage:

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Fujifilm X100VI added to studio scene

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Fujifilm X100VI added to studio scene


As part of the work on our review of the Fujifilm X100VI, we’ve shot and processed our standard studio test images with the camera.

Our test scene is designed to simulate a variety of textures, colors and detail types you’ll encounter in the real world. It also has two illumination modes to see the effect of different lighting conditions.

Given the camera is based on a sensor we’ve seen before, there are few surprizes in terms of its performance. It produces more detail than the 26MP sensor in the X100V. Inevitably it shows more noise at the pixel level than lower-res sensors, but is comparable when viewed at the same output size, up until the very highest ISO settings.

Lens performance

The studio scene is not intended as a lens test: we typically use very high-performance lenses at an aperture that delivers high levels of cross-frame consistency with little risk of diffraction limiting the performance. However, with the X100VI, we have no choice but to use the built-in lens.

The 35mm equiv field of view means we have to move much closer to the target but this is still at over 40x focal length, so not especially close-up. An aperture value of F5.6 means we’re not being especially challenging.

And the X100VI’s lens appears to acquit itself well in these circumstances. In the JPEGs it’s comparably detailed near the center as the X-H2’s results, using our standard 56mm F1.2 R testing lens (though the X100VI is possibly having to apply more sharpening to deliver this result). Things get a little softer towards the corners and exhibit (easily corrected) lateral chromatic aberration and some vignetting in the Raw conversion, but overall the lens appears to be doing a good job in front of a high-resolution sensor.

As with all the other 40MP X-Trans cameras, the Adobe Camera Raw conversion isn’t showing the same levels of contrast or sharpening that the camera’s own JPEGs do, so it’s worth downloading the Raw files to see whether your preferred software and processing workflow produce results you’re happier with. But overall, we feel it does well.



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iOS app mood.camera aims to recreate the experience of shooting film

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iOS app mood.camera aims to recreate the experience of shooting film


Image: mood.camera

A new camera app that wants to offer a film-like experience is now available. The mood.camera app (iOS only) targets fans of analog photography and consists of 14 film-like filters. I was given early access to the app to test it out and see if it offers anything different from similar apps on the market.

There’s been a resurgence in analog photography recently. Though many desire the look of film, they don’t necessarily enjoy the process (and time) of using analog cameras. mood.camera aims to bridge the gap between film and digital by offering filters that emulate film stocks such as Kodak Portra, CineStill and Chrome.

Inside the app, users can imitate a change in ISO (ranging from 100 to 3200) and will notice less detail and more grain the higher you go. There’s also a digital tonal range dial that impacts the amount of contrast and saturation in an image.

Image: Dan Ginn (made with mood.camera). Filter: Chrome

This isn’t the first app trying to emulate the look of film photography. Other apps, such as 1998 Vintage Camera and VSCO, offer filters that provide a classic look, as does Hipstamatic, one of the first smartphone apps within this niche.

What sets mood.camera apart is how it provides an analog-esque process to image making. Whereas other apps provide a live preview of filters and simulations, mood.camera doesn’t.

The app’s developer said the intention was to “mirror the classic film camera experience.” To see how the images turn out, you must view the photos in Apple’s Photos app.

Image: Dan Ginn (made with mood.camera). Filter: Portra

Some obvious features are missing in the app. There’s no portrait mode, which the developer says is because “Apple does not let you capture ProRaw and depth data.” There’s no night mode either, which the developer claims is possible to add but isn’t interested in doing so at this time.

Image: Dan Ginn (made with mood.camera). Filter: Chrome

Having used the app for a week, it did bring a new sense of enjoyment to mobile photography. I liked not having a live preview of my images. Its absence allowed me to worry less about the outcome and focus more on the process of creating photographs.

There was a distinct difference in each of the filters, and while they’ll never be 100 percent like stock film, they’re close. Unlike some apps I have tried before, I found it easy to navigate through the different filters in mood.camera, and the app itself was quick and responsive.

Image: Dan Ginn (made with mood.camera). Filter: Cine

If you want to adapt your smartphone photography workflow and like the classic look, then mood.camera is worth trying. There’s a seven-day free trial available before committing to a paid subscription.

mood. camera is now available on the App Store and costs $1.99 per month or $14.99 as a one-time purchase. A free trial is available to evaluate the app.



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Tamron developing 11-20mm F2.8 Di III-A RXD for Canon RF mount

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Tamron developing 11-20mm F2.8 Di III-A RXD for Canon RF mount


Image: Tamron

Tamron has announced it’s developing a version of its 11-20mm F2.8 Di III-A RXD fast wide-angle zoom lens for Canon RF-mount APS-C cameras.

The 11-20mm F2.8, which is already available for Sony E-mount, will offer an 18-32mm equivalent range on Canon’s 1.6x crop cameras.

The lens, released under license from Canon, was announced simultaneously with SIgma’s announcement that it will offer six of its DC DN range of APS-C lenses for the same mount. Notably all seven lenses are for the smaller format RF-mount models.

The company says the 11-20mm will be available before the end of 2024. No details of pricing has been given.

TAMRON announces development of first CANON RF mount lens

April 23, 2024, 12AM ET / April 22, 2024, 9PM PT, Commack, NY – Tamron Co., Ltd. (President & CEO: Shogo Sakuraba; Headquarters: Saitama City, Japan; “TAMRON”), a leading manufacturer of optics for diverse applications, announces the development of TAMRON’s first CANON RF mount lens, 11-20mm F/2.8 Di III-A[1] RXD (Model B060), an ultra wide-angle zoom lens for APS-C mirrorless cameras. The lens is expected to launch within 2024.

TAMRON’s lenses for mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras are highly regarded for their combination of superior optical performance and compact, lightweight designs. After receiving many requests from customers to offer lenses compatible with the CANON RF mount, TAMRON made the decision to develop a lens for the CANON RF mount under a license agreement.

The 11-20mm F2.8 is a fast-aperture zoom lens covering a focal length range from ultra wide-angle 11mm to 20mm[2], with a maximum aperture of F2.8 across its full range of focal lengths. With a surprisingly compact and lightweight design for a fast, ultra wide-angle zoom lens, the lens feels well balanced when attached to a compact APS-C mirrorless camera body, making it ideal for regular use. Despite its small, lightweight design, it also delivers high-level imaging power with an uncompromising optical design. Wide macro shooting is possible at 11mm with an MOD (Minimum Object Distance) of 0.15m (5.9”) and maximum magnification ratio of 1:4, and its stunning close-range shooting performance enables creative use of perspective at the wide end. The lens also incorporates an AF drive system with an RXD (Rapid-eXtra-silent stepping Drive) stepping motor unit that is remarkably quiet. The lens accurately captures not only still images but also video. It is also highly practical, with Moisture-Resistant Construction, Fluorine Coating, and other features designed for outdoor shooting, enabling users to easily enjoy the high image quality of this ultra wide-angle large-aperture F2.8 lens under a range of conditions.

Product Features

  1. Fast-aperture ultra wide-angle zoom lens
  2. Compact and light weight
  3. Outstanding optical performance
  4. MOD of 0.15m (5.9”) and maximum magnification ratio of 1:4
  5. High performance autofocus RXD stepping motor for both still and video use

[1] Di III-A: For APS-C format mirrorless interchangeable-lens cameras

[2] The full-frame equivalent of 17.6-32mm.



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