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Leica introduces APO-Summicron-SL 28mm F2 L-mount lens

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Leica introduces APO-Summicron-SL 28mm F2 L-mount lens

Published Feb 18, 2021
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dpreview staff

Leica has introduced the APO-Summicron-SL 28mm F2 ASPH lens for full-frame L-mount bodies. It features 13 elements, 6 of which are aspherical; several of the elements are of the anomalous partial dispersion type to reduce chromatic aberration.

The lens can focus as close as 24cm (9.5″) and the maximum magnification is 0.2X. The focus group is driven by a stepping motor that Leica calls ‘Dual Syncro Drive’. The 28mm F2 has a newly designed manual focus ring that uses magnetic fields to improve responsiveness and precision.

The 28mm F2 is weather-sealed and weighs in at 700g (1.5lbs) without its hood. It accepts 67mm filters.

The APO-Summicron-SL 28mm F2 ASPH is now available for $5195.

Press release:

Leica Launches the APO-Summicron-SL 28 f/2 ASPH.:

Exemplifying A Commitment to Developing High-Performing Innovative Technologies in the World of Camera Optics

February 18, 2021. With the APO-Summicron-SL 28 f/2 ASPH., Leica Camera presents yet another high-performance wide-angle lens for the Leica SL-System. The APO-Summicron-SL 28 f/2 ASPH. is the latest addition to the ever-expanding APO-Summicron-SL series that includes a lens range renowned for its top-level optical performance and extremely fast and reliable autofocus.

Following the existing focal lengths of 35, 50, 75 and 90 mm, the APO-Summicron-SL 28 f/2 ASPH. is the first true wide-angle prime lens in this series, making the APO-Summicron-SL 28 f/2 ASPH. especially suitable for reportage, interior and architectural photography. Its maximum aperture can be used without any loss of image quality and offers additional creative possibilities through the exquisite balance of sharp subjects and lovely soft background blur. Thanks to the L-Mount standard, the APO-Summicron-SL 28 f/2 ASPH. is equally compatible with cameras made by other partners of the L-Mount Alliance that have been equipped with the Leica-developed lens mount.

As is universally appreciated with all Leica lenses, the fastest aperture delivers maximum performance. As a result, reducing the aperture is only necessary for compositional and creative purposes. Leica lenses always deliver an exceptional quality of natural skin tones, soft transitions into creamy bokeh, contrast-rich details and edge-to-edge sharpness across a distortion-free image. Yet the APO-Summicron-SL 28 f/2 ASPH. is further distinguished by its apochromatic correction, which is a notable feature in a lens of this focal length, and its six aspherical lens surfaces. To ensure the optimal correction of chromatic aberrations, the majority of the grouped lens elements feature anomalous partial dispersion and are made of high-quality specialized glass. The end result is a wide-angle lens that delivers impeccable images complete with the “Leica Look” to help realize a creative vision in any avenue of photography.

The autofocus drive of all APO-Summicron-SL lenses utilizes extremely robust and high-performance stepping motors with DSD® (Dual Syncro Drive™). This enables the AF to travel the entire focusing range in around 250 milliseconds. Leica Camera also takes an innovative approach to manual focusing technology, including an entirely new manual focus ring construction in the form of an embedded ring magnet with alternating north-south polarization. When the ring is turned, the magnetic field changes its polarity. A sensor monitors the status of the magnetic field and sends the data to the main processor. The drive then shifts the lens to the corresponding focusing position based on the angle of rotation and the rotational speed, delivering even faster and more precise manual focusing to match the lens’s quick and accurate autofocus.

Both the construction and design of the cutting-edge APO-Summicron-SL series represent the next step forward in the development of lenses for the Leica SL-System. New, extremely precise manufacturing methods and measuring technologies have been developed specifically for the production of these lenses, resulting in more compact dimensions as well as truly outstanding imaging performance. In the construction of the APO-Summicron-SL lenses, particular attention has been paid to the prevention of stray light and reflections by applying a high-quality coating to the lens surfaces. Thanks to their effective sealing against dust, moisture, and water spray, as well as the Aquadura coating of the exposed lens surfaces, these extremely durable lenses can be used in nearly any weather condition without any cause for concern. The ever-expanding portfolio of Leica SL lenses are built to withstand the elements and the test of time, matching its futureproof counterparts in the SL2 and SL2-S with their rugged construction and continuing firmware development ensuring a long service life.

The APO-Summicron-SL 28 f/2 ASPH. is available now at Leica Stores, Boutiques and Dealers for $5,195.00.

About Leica Camera

Leica represents a union of craftsmanship, design and experience. It is a beautiful collision of art and engineering, and the future of form and functionality. Leica Camera, headquartered in Wetzlar, Germany, is an internationally operating, premium-segment manufacturer of cameras and sport optics products. The legendary status of the Leica brand is founded on a long tradition of excellence in the supreme quality and performance of cameras and lenses, and the iconic images that artists and photojournalists everywhere captured with them. For more information about Leica visit www.leicacamerausa.com, or follow the brand on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Leica APO-Summicron-SL 28mm F2 ASPH specifications

Principal specifications
Lens type Prime lens
Max Format size 35mm FF
Focal length 28 mm
Image stabilization No
Lens mount L-Mount
Aperture
Maximum aperture F2
Minimum aperture F22
Aperture ring No
Optics
Elements 13
Groups 10
Special elements / coatings 6 aspherical elements
Focus
Minimum focus 0.24 m (9.45)
Maximum magnification 0.2×
Autofocus Yes
Motor type Stepper motor
Full time manual No
Focus method Internal
Distance scale No
DoF scale No
Focus distance limiter No
Physical
Weight 700 g (1.54 lb)
Diameter 73 mm (2.87)
Length 102 mm (4.02)
Materials Magnesium alloy
Sealing Yes
Colour Black
Filter thread 67 mm
Hood supplied Yes
Tripod collar No

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  1. Pingback: Field review: Panasonic S 70-300mm F4.5-5.6 Macro OIS | godsownmedia

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


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We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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Camera

On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless

Published

on

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


We’d never before seen so much silicon wrapped up in such a small package

Photo: Samuel Spencer

The Hasselblad X1D beat Fujifilm to the market by three months in 2016 to become the first mirrorless medium format camera. It wasn’t the first “affordable” (or, at least, sub-$10,000) medium format option: that credit goes to Pentax and its 645D and Z, but it was the first larger-than-full-frame digital camera to be designed as a self-contained ILC with no mirror.

It was built around the same 50MP CMOS sensor as the 645Z, which also underpinned the Fujifilm GFX 50 models, producing some excellent image quality. Hasselblad’s modern minimalist design was eye-catching, and the operability improved significantly through a series of firmware updates (though it never offered the mass-market slickness of the GFX models).

One of the factors that allowed the Hasselblad to be so small was the decision to build leaf shutters into all the XCD lenses, rather than having a physical shutter in the camera body. This resulted in a camera that could sync with flashes all the way up to each lens’s maximum shutter speed. Though this came at the cost both of higher lens prices and of polygonal bokeh, as the shutter/aperture mechanisms had relatively few blades. This second issue was somewhat resolved by an update that allowed the aperture to be opened a fraction beyond the widest listed value, so that the blades don’t intrude on the image.

Click here to see the nearly 200 photos we’ve published from the X1D

Alongside the X1D came the first series of medium format lenses designed specifically for 44x33mm digital, giving some excellent results (to the point that moiré is a significant risk even when stopped-down to F5.6, given the lack of low-pass filter on the X1D’s sensor). It also led to the only instance we’ve seen of a manufacturer referring to equivalent f-numbers. It’s probably no surprise that it would be one of the only companies to solely produce larger than full-frame systems.

We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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