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Luminar AI Update 2 available now, includes significant updates to Sky AI

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Luminar AI Update 2 available now, includes significant updates to Sky AI

Skylum today released Luminar AI Update 2, a free update to Luminar AI focused on improving sky replacement, simplifying workflows and more.

Of the update to the AI-powered photo editor, Skylum CEO Alex Tsepko said, ‘Too often, complexity is the enemy of creativity. It adds time and frustration to a process we think should be fun, even joyful. With Luminar AI, our goal is to strip out that complexity. Update 2 builds on this work and offers more creative tools. I am excited to see what people make with it.’

Image credit: Imaginechina

Luminar AI Update 2 includes many improvements, but one of the biggest is to Sky AI. Building upon Skylum’s history with automatic sky replacement technology, the latest Luminar AI update incorporates user feedback to take Sky AI to greater heights.

Luminar AI now automatically reflects the new sky in water, whether it’s the ocean, a river, lake or pool. The software automatically conforms the new sky’s reflection to the angle and depth of the scene to produce what Skylum promises are ‘incredible results.’ Sky AI can add reflections to ripples on the surface of water as well.

Additional improvements to Sky AI include a new Relight Human feature, which can improve environmental portraits by matching people in an image to the new sky for a more natural, realistic result. Scene relighting can also now remove strong color casts from the sky on foreground objects. Further, there are new controls for rotation and horizontal offset, allowing the user to flip, rotate and position the sky in their image. Rounding out the Sky AI improvements is a new visual interface in the Sky AI panel, including additional free skies to choose from.

Image credit: Ivan Kmit

In addition to Sky AI improvements, Luminar AI Update 2 includes transformable texture overlays. PNG files with transparency can be used in Luminar AI as textures, which may be useful for adding special effects, watermarks, text, emoticons and other elements to images. Users can move, flip, rotate and resize overlay elements. There are blending modes and masks for texture overlays as well. Overlays can be synced across multiple images or saved in a custom Template for future use, which should save photographers time if they’re using the new feature for watermarking.

Image credit: LadanivskyyO

Speaking of Templates, a key feature in Luminar AI, it is now easier to find and use Templates. All Templates, including Favorites and purchased Templates, are available in the main Templates tab.

The new update to Luminar AI adds additional camera support. Canon EOS R5, Canon EOS R6, EOS 850D, EOS-1D X Mark III (lossy compressed files), Fujifilm X-S10, Leica M10-R, S3, SL2-S, Nikon Z 5, Z 6 II, Z 7 II, Olympus E-M10 Mark IV, Panasonic DC-G100 / G110, DC-S5, Sony ILCE-7C (A7C), ILCE-7SM3 (A7S III) and Zeiss ZX1 cameras are supported in the new update. Lossy compressed .CR3 files and Lossy compressed .RAF files are supported, too.

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


We’d never before seen so much silicon wrapped up in such a small package

Photo: Samuel Spencer

The Hasselblad X1D beat Fujifilm to the market by three months in 2016 to become the first mirrorless medium format camera. It wasn’t the first “affordable” (or, at least, sub-$10,000) medium format option: that credit goes to Pentax and its 645D and Z, but it was the first larger-than-full-frame digital camera to be designed as a self-contained ILC with no mirror.

It was built around the same 50MP CMOS sensor as the 645Z, which also underpinned the Fujifilm GFX 50 models, producing some excellent image quality. Hasselblad’s modern minimalist design was eye-catching, and the operability improved significantly through a series of firmware updates (though it never offered the mass-market slickness of the GFX models).

One of the factors that allowed the Hasselblad to be so small was the decision to build leaf shutters into all the XCD lenses, rather than having a physical shutter in the camera body. This resulted in a camera that could sync with flashes all the way up to each lens’s maximum shutter speed. Though this came at the cost both of higher lens prices and of polygonal bokeh, as the shutter/aperture mechanisms had relatively few blades. This second issue was somewhat resolved by an update that allowed the aperture to be opened a fraction beyond the widest listed value, so that the blades don’t intrude on the image.

Click here to see the nearly 200 photos we’ve published from the X1D

Alongside the X1D came the first series of medium format lenses designed specifically for 44x33mm digital, giving some excellent results (to the point that moiré is a significant risk even when stopped-down to F5.6, given the lack of low-pass filter on the X1D’s sensor). It also led to the only instance we’ve seen of a manufacturer referring to equivalent f-numbers. It’s probably no surprise that it would be one of the only companies to solely produce larger than full-frame systems.

We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless

Published

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


We’d never before seen so much silicon wrapped up in such a small package

Photo: Samuel Spencer

The Hasselblad X1D beat Fujifilm to the market by three months in 2016 to become the first mirrorless medium format camera. It wasn’t the first “affordable” (or, at least, sub-$10,000) medium format option: that credit goes to Pentax and its 645D and Z, but it was the first larger-than-full-frame digital camera to be designed as a self-contained ILC with no mirror.

It was built around the same 50MP CMOS sensor as the 645Z, which also underpinned the Fujifilm GFX 50 models, producing some excellent image quality. Hasselblad’s modern minimalist design was eye-catching, and the operability improved significantly through a series of firmware updates (though it never offered the mass-market slickness of the GFX models).

One of the factors that allowed the Hasselblad to be so small was the decision to build leaf shutters into all the XCD lenses, rather than having a physical shutter in the camera body. This resulted in a camera that could sync with flashes all the way up to each lens’s maximum shutter speed. Though this came at the cost both of higher lens prices and of polygonal bokeh, as the shutter/aperture mechanisms had relatively few blades. This second issue was somewhat resolved by an update that allowed the aperture to be opened a fraction beyond the widest listed value, so that the blades don’t intrude on the image.

Click here to see the nearly 200 photos we’ve published from the X1D

Alongside the X1D came the first series of medium format lenses designed specifically for 44x33mm digital, giving some excellent results (to the point that moiré is a significant risk even when stopped-down to F5.6, given the lack of low-pass filter on the X1D’s sensor). It also led to the only instance we’ve seen of a manufacturer referring to equivalent f-numbers. It’s probably no surprise that it would be one of the only companies to solely produce larger than full-frame systems.

We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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Our favorite ‘natural worlds’ pictures: DPReview Editors’ Challenge results

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Our favorite ‘natural worlds’ pictures: DPReview Editors’ Challenge results


June includes multiple days devoted to celebrating nature, including World Environment Day (June 5), World Oceans Day (June 8) and World Rainforest Day (June 22). In that spirit, we chose ‘Natural Worlds’ as the theme for our most recent Editors’ Choice photo challenge, with over 100 readers submitting entries.

We love seeing your work! Thanks to everyone who submitted. We couldn’t call out every image we liked, so we restrained ourselves to a baker’s dozen (in no particular order).

If you don’t see your work here today, don’t despair. We’ll soon announce a new Editors’ Choice challenge.

Also, a quick reminder to keep comments constructive and civil. These are images submitted by your fellow readers who took the time to share their work. Rule #1: Be nice. That’s it, there is no rule #2.



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