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NASA shares Perseverance’s first 360° view of Mars

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NASA shares Perseverance’s first 360° view of Mars

On February 18, NASA’s Perseverance rover landed on Mars and sent back to Earth its first images. Since then, NASA’s Perseverance team has been busy exploring the Jezero Crater area. NASA has followed up its initial images with a high-quality, detailed 360° interactive image.

The video below, which has on-screen controls when viewed in a compatible browser on desktop or the YouTube app on mobile devices, shows a 360° view from Perseverance’s landing site on Mars.

The images above were captured using Perseverance’s onboard color Navigation Cameras, or Navcams. The Navcams are on the remote sensing mast (or ‘head’) of Perseverance. The Navcams are part of a group of 19 total cameras on the rover itself. You can see the location of the Navcams on a 3D model of Perseverance below. If you’d like to explore the 3D model for yourself, you can do so here.

Outlined in blue are Perseverance’s two NavCams. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

There are a pair of 20MP Navcams on Perseverance. The Navcams are ‘engineering cameras.’ There are nine engineering cameras in total, all capturing 20MP color images. There are seven imaging units in the EDL Camera Suite, four of which were used during descent, ranging from 1.3 to 3.1MP. Finally, there are seven science cameras onboard. These range from 0.43MP to 4MP and are used for specific analytical and investigative tasks during Perseverance’s mission. You can learn more about the cameras here.

Perseverance’s cameras and their locations. Click to enlarge. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

To already 4K imagery from Mars published mere days after the rover landed is an impressive accomplishment. NASA has published additional images since our initial coverage, which can be viewed in this regularly-updated gallery on NASA’s Perseverance website.

Yesterday, NASA released a new video showing Perseverance’s descent on February 18. It includes views from several cameras as part of the rover’s entry, descent and landing stages. The included audio is from mission control.

You can view a map below. It shows where the rover itself and its many parts landed on the Martian surface.

”This first image of NASA’s Perseverance Rover on the surface of Mars from the HiRISE camera aboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows many parts of the Mars 2020 mission landing system that got the rover safely on the ground.’ Image and caption credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

There will be much more to come from Perseverance. To see new videos as NASA publishes them, subscribe to the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory YouTube channel and NASA’s YouTube channel.

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


We’d never before seen so much silicon wrapped up in such a small package

Photo: Samuel Spencer

The Hasselblad X1D beat Fujifilm to the market by three months in 2016 to become the first mirrorless medium format camera. It wasn’t the first “affordable” (or, at least, sub-$10,000) medium format option: that credit goes to Pentax and its 645D and Z, but it was the first larger-than-full-frame digital camera to be designed as a self-contained ILC with no mirror.

It was built around the same 50MP CMOS sensor as the 645Z, which also underpinned the Fujifilm GFX 50 models, producing some excellent image quality. Hasselblad’s modern minimalist design was eye-catching, and the operability improved significantly through a series of firmware updates (though it never offered the mass-market slickness of the GFX models).

One of the factors that allowed the Hasselblad to be so small was the decision to build leaf shutters into all the XCD lenses, rather than having a physical shutter in the camera body. This resulted in a camera that could sync with flashes all the way up to each lens’s maximum shutter speed. Though this came at the cost both of higher lens prices and of polygonal bokeh, as the shutter/aperture mechanisms had relatively few blades. This second issue was somewhat resolved by an update that allowed the aperture to be opened a fraction beyond the widest listed value, so that the blades don’t intrude on the image.

Click here to see the nearly 200 photos we’ve published from the X1D

Alongside the X1D came the first series of medium format lenses designed specifically for 44x33mm digital, giving some excellent results (to the point that moiré is a significant risk even when stopped-down to F5.6, given the lack of low-pass filter on the X1D’s sensor). It also led to the only instance we’ve seen of a manufacturer referring to equivalent f-numbers. It’s probably no surprise that it would be one of the only companies to solely produce larger than full-frame systems.

We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


We’d never before seen so much silicon wrapped up in such a small package

Photo: Samuel Spencer

The Hasselblad X1D beat Fujifilm to the market by three months in 2016 to become the first mirrorless medium format camera. It wasn’t the first “affordable” (or, at least, sub-$10,000) medium format option: that credit goes to Pentax and its 645D and Z, but it was the first larger-than-full-frame digital camera to be designed as a self-contained ILC with no mirror.

It was built around the same 50MP CMOS sensor as the 645Z, which also underpinned the Fujifilm GFX 50 models, producing some excellent image quality. Hasselblad’s modern minimalist design was eye-catching, and the operability improved significantly through a series of firmware updates (though it never offered the mass-market slickness of the GFX models).

One of the factors that allowed the Hasselblad to be so small was the decision to build leaf shutters into all the XCD lenses, rather than having a physical shutter in the camera body. This resulted in a camera that could sync with flashes all the way up to each lens’s maximum shutter speed. Though this came at the cost both of higher lens prices and of polygonal bokeh, as the shutter/aperture mechanisms had relatively few blades. This second issue was somewhat resolved by an update that allowed the aperture to be opened a fraction beyond the widest listed value, so that the blades don’t intrude on the image.

Click here to see the nearly 200 photos we’ve published from the X1D

Alongside the X1D came the first series of medium format lenses designed specifically for 44x33mm digital, giving some excellent results (to the point that moiré is a significant risk even when stopped-down to F5.6, given the lack of low-pass filter on the X1D’s sensor). It also led to the only instance we’ve seen of a manufacturer referring to equivalent f-numbers. It’s probably no surprise that it would be one of the only companies to solely produce larger than full-frame systems.

We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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Our favorite ‘natural worlds’ pictures: DPReview Editors’ Challenge results

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Our favorite ‘natural worlds’ pictures: DPReview Editors’ Challenge results


June includes multiple days devoted to celebrating nature, including World Environment Day (June 5), World Oceans Day (June 8) and World Rainforest Day (June 22). In that spirit, we chose ‘Natural Worlds’ as the theme for our most recent Editors’ Choice photo challenge, with over 100 readers submitting entries.

We love seeing your work! Thanks to everyone who submitted. We couldn’t call out every image we liked, so we restrained ourselves to a baker’s dozen (in no particular order).

If you don’t see your work here today, don’t despair. We’ll soon announce a new Editors’ Choice challenge.

Also, a quick reminder to keep comments constructive and civil. These are images submitted by your fellow readers who took the time to share their work. Rule #1: Be nice. That’s it, there is no rule #2.



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