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Panasonic announces 26mm F8 body-cap manual lens and trails 18-40mm

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Panasonic announces 26mm F8 body-cap manual lens and trails 18-40mm


Image: Panasonic

Alongside the S9 social media camera, Panasonic has announced the 26mm F8, a manual focus, fixed aperture lens for the L-mount system. It’s also said it will release a compact 18-40mm F4.5-6.3 zoom lens for L-mount “soon.”

The company refers to the 18mm-deep (0.71″) lens as a “pancake” lens, but its stripped-back feature set reminds us more of Olympus’s 15mm F8 “body cap” lens for the Micro Four Thirds system.

This impression is reinforced by the lens not accepting lens caps or filters and instead having a protective element across the front, which is not part of its design’s optical formula, suggesting it’s designed to withstand being left on the camera.

The Panasonic design is a little wider than the Olympus and has significantly shallower depth-of-field than the F16-equiv behavior of the 15mm on Micro Four Thirds. As a result it has to have a short-throw focus ring, rather than the close-focus/1.5m–infinity switch on the older lens.

Image: Panasonic

The Lumix S 26mm F8 weighs just 58g (2.0oz) and will retail for a recommended price of $199. We also expect it to be bundled with the S9 without adding significantly to the cost of the kit.

Panasonic also said it will be launching an 18-40mm F4.5-6.3 compact zoom lens soon. The only detail give about the ultra-wide to fractionally-wide-of-normal zoom is that it will focus down as close as 0.15m (5.9″).

Its short range and relatively modest aperture range will presumably see it act as a low-cost alternative to the $1500 Lumix S 16-35mm F4, rather than a rival to the $600 20-60mm F3.5-5.6.

Press Release:

Panasonic Introduces LUMIX S Series Fixed Focal Length Pancake Lens: LUMIX S 26mm F8 (S-R26)

Newark, N.J. (May 22, 2024) – Panasonic is pleased to announce the new LUMIX S 26mm F8 (S-R26), an incredibly compact and lightweight lens designed to be the perfect match to the new LUMIX S9 camera body. Despite its slim profile, the 26mm features the superior design, high resolution, and outstanding image quality for which LUMIX has become known for.

With a focal length of 26mm, a fixed F-stop of F8, and manual focus only, this new pancake lens is designed for the simple enjoyment of manual shooting with creative composition and exposure. Perfect for spontaneously capturing fleeting moments, the 26mm delivers unique results compared to the existing line-up of LUMIX S Series wide-angle, fixed focal length lenses.

Main Features

  1. The fixed focal length pancake lens in the LUMIX S Series
    • Manual focus allows creators to take full control of their own personal style of content creation
    • The lens has a wide angle of 26mm and a fixed F-stop of F8
    • Enjoy unlimited creative possibilities from pan-focusing to bokeh effects.
  2. Compact, lightweight lens perfect for everyday
    • Ultimate portability with a thin and lightweight body that fits into your pocket
    • Easy to carry around and start shooting at a moment’s notice, making it ideal for spontaneous snapshots
    • Overall length of approximately 18.1mm and a weight of approximately 58g/0.13lb.
    • Designed to match the compact body of LUMIX S9.

・ This lens is for manual focus only, fixed at F8. The camera’s AF setting and some MF assist functions cannot be used.
・ External filters cannot be attached.

The new LUMIX S 26mm F8 (S-R26) will be available for purchase in late June 2024 at valued channel partners for $199.99.

Coming soon:
A new compact versatile zoom lens: LUMIX S 18-40mm F4.5-6.3

A new LUMIX S 18-40mm F4.5-6.3 lens is coming to the full frame LUMIX S Series lens line-up soon. A compact and versatile zoom lens ideal for daily use, the upcoming 18-40mm has a minimum shooting distance of 0.15m/0.49ft. This everyday lens is designed to match the LUMIX S9 and covers focal lengths from an ultra-wide angle of 18mm to a semi-standard 40mm.

Panasonic Lumix S 26mm F8 specifications

Principal specifications
Lens type Prime lens
Max Format size 35mm FF
Focal length 26 mm
Image stabilization No
Lens mount L-Mount
Aperture
Maximum aperture F8
Minimum aperture F8
Aperture ring No
Number of diaphragm blades 1
Aperture notes Fixed aperture lens
Optics
Elements 5
Groups 5
Special elements / coatings 1 UED element
Focus
Minimum focus 0.25 m (9.84)
Maximum magnification 0.14×
Autofocus No
Full time manual Yes
Focus method Internal
Distance scale No
DoF scale No
Physical
Weight 58 g (0.13 lb)
Diameter 67 mm (2.64)
Length 18 mm (0.71)
Materials Plastic
Sealing No
Filter notes Filters cannot be attached
Hood supplied No
Tripod collar No



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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


We’d never before seen so much silicon wrapped up in such a small package

Photo: Samuel Spencer

The Hasselblad X1D beat Fujifilm to the market by three months in 2016 to become the first mirrorless medium format camera. It wasn’t the first “affordable” (or, at least, sub-$10,000) medium format option: that credit goes to Pentax and its 645D and Z, but it was the first larger-than-full-frame digital camera to be designed as a self-contained ILC with no mirror.

It was built around the same 50MP CMOS sensor as the 645Z, which also underpinned the Fujifilm GFX 50 models, producing some excellent image quality. Hasselblad’s modern minimalist design was eye-catching, and the operability improved significantly through a series of firmware updates (though it never offered the mass-market slickness of the GFX models).

One of the factors that allowed the Hasselblad to be so small was the decision to build leaf shutters into all the XCD lenses, rather than having a physical shutter in the camera body. This resulted in a camera that could sync with flashes all the way up to each lens’s maximum shutter speed. Though this came at the cost both of higher lens prices and of polygonal bokeh, as the shutter/aperture mechanisms had relatively few blades. This second issue was somewhat resolved by an update that allowed the aperture to be opened a fraction beyond the widest listed value, so that the blades don’t intrude on the image.

Click here to see the nearly 200 photos we’ve published from the X1D

Alongside the X1D came the first series of medium format lenses designed specifically for 44x33mm digital, giving some excellent results (to the point that moiré is a significant risk even when stopped-down to F5.6, given the lack of low-pass filter on the X1D’s sensor). It also led to the only instance we’ve seen of a manufacturer referring to equivalent f-numbers. It’s probably no surprise that it would be one of the only companies to solely produce larger than full-frame systems.

We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


We’d never before seen so much silicon wrapped up in such a small package

Photo: Samuel Spencer

The Hasselblad X1D beat Fujifilm to the market by three months in 2016 to become the first mirrorless medium format camera. It wasn’t the first “affordable” (or, at least, sub-$10,000) medium format option: that credit goes to Pentax and its 645D and Z, but it was the first larger-than-full-frame digital camera to be designed as a self-contained ILC with no mirror.

It was built around the same 50MP CMOS sensor as the 645Z, which also underpinned the Fujifilm GFX 50 models, producing some excellent image quality. Hasselblad’s modern minimalist design was eye-catching, and the operability improved significantly through a series of firmware updates (though it never offered the mass-market slickness of the GFX models).

One of the factors that allowed the Hasselblad to be so small was the decision to build leaf shutters into all the XCD lenses, rather than having a physical shutter in the camera body. This resulted in a camera that could sync with flashes all the way up to each lens’s maximum shutter speed. Though this came at the cost both of higher lens prices and of polygonal bokeh, as the shutter/aperture mechanisms had relatively few blades. This second issue was somewhat resolved by an update that allowed the aperture to be opened a fraction beyond the widest listed value, so that the blades don’t intrude on the image.

Click here to see the nearly 200 photos we’ve published from the X1D

Alongside the X1D came the first series of medium format lenses designed specifically for 44x33mm digital, giving some excellent results (to the point that moiré is a significant risk even when stopped-down to F5.6, given the lack of low-pass filter on the X1D’s sensor). It also led to the only instance we’ve seen of a manufacturer referring to equivalent f-numbers. It’s probably no surprise that it would be one of the only companies to solely produce larger than full-frame systems.

We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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Our favorite ‘natural worlds’ pictures: DPReview Editors’ Challenge results

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Our favorite ‘natural worlds’ pictures: DPReview Editors’ Challenge results


June includes multiple days devoted to celebrating nature, including World Environment Day (June 5), World Oceans Day (June 8) and World Rainforest Day (June 22). In that spirit, we chose ‘Natural Worlds’ as the theme for our most recent Editors’ Choice photo challenge, with over 100 readers submitting entries.

We love seeing your work! Thanks to everyone who submitted. We couldn’t call out every image we liked, so we restrained ourselves to a baker’s dozen (in no particular order).

If you don’t see your work here today, don’t despair. We’ll soon announce a new Editors’ Choice challenge.

Also, a quick reminder to keep comments constructive and civil. These are images submitted by your fellow readers who took the time to share their work. Rule #1: Be nice. That’s it, there is no rule #2.



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