Connect with us

Camera

Royal Photographic Society makes 165 years of its Journal free online

Published

on

Royal Photographic Society makes 165 years of its Journal free online

The Royal Photographic Society has digitized its archive and made issues of its magazine, the RPS Journal, free to read online. Visitors to the Society’s website will be able to read issues dating right back to the first magazine that was published on 3rd March 1853. The frequency of publication has varied slightly over the years, but the RPS claims The Journal is the longest continuously published photographic periodical in the world. The current format of the magazine is published six times a year, and the free archive covers 1853 to 2018, said to be over 30,000 pages of searchable articles packaged into 158 volumes of publications.

Discussion in 1853 of a binocular camera to get over the narrow field of view of current lenses. Click to enlarge.

The RPS covers a full range of photographic interests from professional, technical and scientific to pure enthusiast and artistic, and that breadth is reflected in the content of The Journal. It was the end of 1800’s before pictures appeared — and even then they are drawings of the photographs due to be shown in an exhibition — and members had to wait until the 1920s before photographs were able to be printed on the pages.

2014 was clearly a low point for The Journal, as it allowed any idiot to write about their favourite camera. Click to enlarge (and see the joke).

The Journal’s archive is a fantastic record of photographic technology as well as of changing styles and the growth of popularity of photography as a pass-time as well as a profession. Its advertising pages give us a running commentary of camera equipment and consumables over the last century and a half, regular picture-based features chart movements in technique and art, while the search feature will take you directly to coverage of major, and minor, photographers since the beginning of photographic time. You can even find results under ‘Demolder’! For more information see the Royal Photographic Society’s website.

Source link

Continue Reading
2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Pingback: Facebook Pledges $1 Billion for News, Defends Australia Blackout |

  2. Pingback: Slideshow: Winning photos from the Pink Lady Food Photographer of the Year 2021 contest

Leave a Reply

Camera

Question of the week: What’s your advice to your younger self?

Published

on

By

Question of the week: What’s your advice to your younger self?


Every week, we ask newsletter subscribers a question about gear, creativity or life. We recently asked readers: If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what camera-related advice would you give yourself?

Subsequently, the DPReview editors also got in on the act:

1. Shaminder Dulai

Start organizing your photo and video archive and making it searchable. Make sure to save local versions of client work; websites will disappear and take your work with them. A good archival system makes it possible to earn a passive income from these photos and videos in the future and curate your work for grant applications and shows.

Don’t get caught up in the gear; there will always be something better that comes along. Make things. Whatever you can get your hands on, just use it and make stuff. The more you practice and embrace the failures, the more you’ll learn and improve.

There will be people who will try to discourage you; they’ll tell you you don’t have the right gear, the right skills, or the right name, and some will even steal your ideas and pass them off as their own. These will be hard lessons, and you’ll need to learn to put yourself before others. It won’t be easy.

Also, buy as much Apple stock as you can afford and spend more time with your parents. Ask them the questions you always were too afraid to ask.


2. Dale Baskin

I’d probably give the same advice I would give a 20-year-old today: Don’t obsess about having fancy gear or the newest camera. Buy something used in good condition and save some money, then spend the money you save on fun experiences that allow you to focus on learning the art of photography.


3. Richard Butler

Focus on the lenses you’ll actually use. Look at the photos you’ve taken to see what you’re trying to capture. Consider whether the discipline (and compactness) of a prime would be better than the seemingly obvious F2.8 zoom.


What’s your take? Let us know in the comments.

If you want to participate in the next question, sign up for the newsletter. It’s the best photography, camera and gear news, delivered right to your inbox.

Sign up for the free DPReview Newsletter

And we don’t just stop at the news. Newsletter subscriber benefits include behind-the-scenes articles, letters to the editor, exclusive contests, sneak peeks on what we’re working on, ways to share feedback directly with DPReview editors to help us shape future stories and more! There is no AI here, only real people writing the newsletters and reading your feedback (me!)



Source link

Continue Reading

Camera

Fujifilm X-T50 first-look video and preview samples

Published

on

By

Fujifilm X-T50 first-look video and preview samples


We had a chance to shoot with the Fujifilm X-T50 for quite a while, so we put together a first-look video, outlining what it can offer, as well as shooting a sample gallery using a variety of Film Simulations.

As always, all the Raw files are available to download if you wish to see how your preferred software handles them.

Please do not reproduce any of these images on a website or any newsletter/magazine without prior permission (see our copyright page). We make the originals available for private users to download to their own machines for personal examination or printing (in conjunction with this review); we do so in good faith, so please don’t abuse it.



Gear in this story





Source link

Continue Reading

Camera

Fujifilm X-T50 first-look video and preview samples

Published

on

By

Fujifilm X-T50 first-look video and preview samples


We had a chance to shoot with the Fujifilm X-T50 for quite a while, so we put together a first-look video, outlining what it can offer, as well as shooting a sample gallery using a variety of Film Simulations.

As always, all the Raw files are available to download if you wish to see how your preferred software handles them.

Please do not reproduce any of these images on a website or any newsletter/magazine without prior permission (see our copyright page). We make the originals available for private users to download to their own machines for personal examination or printing (in conjunction with this review); we do so in good faith, so please don’t abuse it.



Gear in this story





Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2017 Zox News Theme. Theme by MVP Themes, powered by WordPress.