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Capture One 21 (14.1.0) released, includes Style Brushes, improved importing and more

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Capture One 21 (14.1.0) released, includes Style Brushes, improved importing and more

Capture One 21 was released this past December and its first major update is now available. Capture One 21 (14.1.0) is a feature release that contains new functionality, new camera and lens support and bug fixes.

New features added to Capture One 21 include new Style Brushes, an improved Import Viewer, additional ProStandard profiles and improvements to Live-View when shooting tethered with supported Leica cameras.

Style Brushes are a new way to work with brushes and layers. Style Brushes are designed to be more accessible and make powerful editing tools instantly available to users. Essentially, the new tool is a streamlined, easy way to make local adjustments to your images.

There are many Style Brushes (seen in the list to the left in this screenshot) in the new version of Capture One 21. You can use Style Brushes to quickly and easily make localized adjustments to your photos. You can also create your own Style Brushes and share them with other photographers.

In Capture One 21 (14.1.0), there are numerous style brushes included to adjust color, light and contrast, and make enhancements. For example, there are built-in Style Brushes for enhancing a subject’s iris in a portrait and for whitening teeth. There are Style Brushes for adjusting brightness, contrast, highlights, shadows and haze. There are also brushes for adding cooling or warmth and tweaking color saturation. You can also create your own custom Style Brushes, and users can share them with other photographers.

The Import Viewer is faster and more useful in Capture One 21 (14.1.0). In the prior version of Capture One, there isn’t a great way to evaluate the images you’re considering importing into your Capture One catalog when importing images. You can’t view an image at large enough magnification to evaluate something like focus. There is a small button at the top of the Import Viewer in the new version, which looks like a large rectangle with three smaller rectangles to its right. When you click this button, you enable a new way to view importable images. This allows you to view a selected image larger, with additional images now relegated to a scrolling area to the right. Further, you can decide which images for import using keyboard shortcuts (S to pick an image, A to unpick an image, spacebar to toggle pick/unpick). You can also deselect all images, as select all is the default setting.

With Capture One 21, ProStandard profiles were introduced. This is a new type of camera profile that renders colors more naturally. Primarily, ProStandard profiles, when compared to older profiles, retain more consistent color tones across levels of saturation and brightness. In Capture One 21 (14.1.0), many new models now include ProStandard profiles, including popular DSLR and mirrorless cameras from Canon, Nikon Olympus and Sony (including the brand-new Alpha 1). For the full list of newly-supported camera models, click here. Among the lengthy list of newly supported cameras, there are some popular older cameras included, such as the Canon 5DS, 6D II, EOS-R, Nikon D5, D800(E), and Sony A7 II, which is great news, as the ProStandard profiles represent a significant improvement in rendering.

New camera support has been added to Capture One 21, including support for Sony’s new flagship full-frame mirrorless camera, the Alpha 1.

There are also some new cameras supported in general inside Capture One 21 (14.1.0). In addition to the Sony A1, support has been added for the Fujifilm GFX 100S, Fujifilm X-E4, Canon SX70 HS, Panasonic GX800, GX850, GX880, GF10, GF90 and GF9.

While not necessarily highlight-worthy new features, Capture One has added some nice improvements with the latest update to various functions and features. The maximum zoom level in the Viewer is increased from 400% to 1600%, which should work well for users on high-resolution monitors. The Keystone Tool has an upgraded user interface. It’s easier to link Brush Settings in the latest version, and you can link Brush with Layer and Eraser with Brush.

In addition to the new Import Viewer, seen here, Capture One 21 (14.1.0) adds numerous other improvements.

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


We’d never before seen so much silicon wrapped up in such a small package

Photo: Samuel Spencer

The Hasselblad X1D beat Fujifilm to the market by three months in 2016 to become the first mirrorless medium format camera. It wasn’t the first “affordable” (or, at least, sub-$10,000) medium format option: that credit goes to Pentax and its 645D and Z, but it was the first larger-than-full-frame digital camera to be designed as a self-contained ILC with no mirror.

It was built around the same 50MP CMOS sensor as the 645Z, which also underpinned the Fujifilm GFX 50 models, producing some excellent image quality. Hasselblad’s modern minimalist design was eye-catching, and the operability improved significantly through a series of firmware updates (though it never offered the mass-market slickness of the GFX models).

One of the factors that allowed the Hasselblad to be so small was the decision to build leaf shutters into all the XCD lenses, rather than having a physical shutter in the camera body. This resulted in a camera that could sync with flashes all the way up to each lens’s maximum shutter speed. Though this came at the cost both of higher lens prices and of polygonal bokeh, as the shutter/aperture mechanisms had relatively few blades. This second issue was somewhat resolved by an update that allowed the aperture to be opened a fraction beyond the widest listed value, so that the blades don’t intrude on the image.

Click here to see the nearly 200 photos we’ve published from the X1D

Alongside the X1D came the first series of medium format lenses designed specifically for 44x33mm digital, giving some excellent results (to the point that moiré is a significant risk even when stopped-down to F5.6, given the lack of low-pass filter on the X1D’s sensor). It also led to the only instance we’ve seen of a manufacturer referring to equivalent f-numbers. It’s probably no surprise that it would be one of the only companies to solely produce larger than full-frame systems.

We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


We’d never before seen so much silicon wrapped up in such a small package

Photo: Samuel Spencer

The Hasselblad X1D beat Fujifilm to the market by three months in 2016 to become the first mirrorless medium format camera. It wasn’t the first “affordable” (or, at least, sub-$10,000) medium format option: that credit goes to Pentax and its 645D and Z, but it was the first larger-than-full-frame digital camera to be designed as a self-contained ILC with no mirror.

It was built around the same 50MP CMOS sensor as the 645Z, which also underpinned the Fujifilm GFX 50 models, producing some excellent image quality. Hasselblad’s modern minimalist design was eye-catching, and the operability improved significantly through a series of firmware updates (though it never offered the mass-market slickness of the GFX models).

One of the factors that allowed the Hasselblad to be so small was the decision to build leaf shutters into all the XCD lenses, rather than having a physical shutter in the camera body. This resulted in a camera that could sync with flashes all the way up to each lens’s maximum shutter speed. Though this came at the cost both of higher lens prices and of polygonal bokeh, as the shutter/aperture mechanisms had relatively few blades. This second issue was somewhat resolved by an update that allowed the aperture to be opened a fraction beyond the widest listed value, so that the blades don’t intrude on the image.

Click here to see the nearly 200 photos we’ve published from the X1D

Alongside the X1D came the first series of medium format lenses designed specifically for 44x33mm digital, giving some excellent results (to the point that moiré is a significant risk even when stopped-down to F5.6, given the lack of low-pass filter on the X1D’s sensor). It also led to the only instance we’ve seen of a manufacturer referring to equivalent f-numbers. It’s probably no surprise that it would be one of the only companies to solely produce larger than full-frame systems.

We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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Our favorite ‘natural worlds’ pictures: DPReview Editors’ Challenge results

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Our favorite ‘natural worlds’ pictures: DPReview Editors’ Challenge results


June includes multiple days devoted to celebrating nature, including World Environment Day (June 5), World Oceans Day (June 8) and World Rainforest Day (June 22). In that spirit, we chose ‘Natural Worlds’ as the theme for our most recent Editors’ Choice photo challenge, with over 100 readers submitting entries.

We love seeing your work! Thanks to everyone who submitted. We couldn’t call out every image we liked, so we restrained ourselves to a baker’s dozen (in no particular order).

If you don’t see your work here today, don’t despair. We’ll soon announce a new Editors’ Choice challenge.

Also, a quick reminder to keep comments constructive and civil. These are images submitted by your fellow readers who took the time to share their work. Rule #1: Be nice. That’s it, there is no rule #2.



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