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Leica announces APO-Summicron-M 35mm F2 ASPH

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Leica announces APO-Summicron-M 35mm F2 ASPH

Leica has announced the release of the APO-Summicron-M 35mm F2 ASPH. The compact 35mm F2 is the closest-focusing M-mount lens, with a minimum focus distance of just 30cm (11.8″).

The optical formula of the 35mm F2 includes 10 elements in 5 groups, with 4 aspherical surfaces. Six elements use anomalous partial dispersion glass to help reduce chromatic aberration. The lens has 11 aperture blades. A screw-on metal hood is included, and the lens is threaded for 39mm filters.

The APO-Summicron-M 35mm F2 ASPH is now available for $8195.

Press release

The New Leica APO-Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. Sets New Benchmarks with Maximum Performance in a Remarkably Compact Size

March 4th 2021 – Leica Camera once again pushes forward to new heights of imaging excellence with the launch of the APO-Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. Like its legendary sibling, the APO-Summicron-M 50 f/2 ASPH., this new 35 mm achieves maximum imaging performance without compromise in one of the most popular focal lengths for photographers throughout history. The result is a lens whose detail rendition will maximize the fullest potential of today’s imaging sensors while poised, futureproof and ready for the technology and resolving power of future sensors. The APO-Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. is the only M-lens with a close-focus distance of just 30 centimeters, unlocking new possibilities.

The 35 mm focal length has always been a staple of the Leica M-System, and now this longstanding lineage of Summicron-M lenses has its new flagship offering the highest possible image performance, an extremely close focus and diminutively compact housing.

The exceptional performance of this lens is made possible by its elaborate optical design combined with its high-precision manufacturing at the Leica factory in Wetzlar. This state-of-the-art engineering earns the Made in Germany quality stamp of approval it bears, yielding an optical instrument that can stand the test of time to deliver decades of use and infinite possibilities. The ten lens elements are divided into five groups. Three elements feature aspherical surfaces (one of them on both sides) for minimizing distortion, while six elements are made of glasses with anomalous partial dispersion, which not only reduce distracting chromatic aberrations to almost zero, but also provide apochromatic correction – a quality rarely found in lenses of this focal length. The resulting images exhibit crisp corner-to-corner sharpness and accurate color fidelity at all apertures and focus distances, both near and far.

The APO-Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. also delivers outstanding results close up, closer than any 35 mm M lens of the past and present, thanks to a floating lens element that ensures consistency at all distances; all the way down to its newly achieved minimum focus of 30 cm. The focus ring turns a full 300°, for precisely accurate and smooth focusing throughout the entire range from its close-focus distance all the way out to infinity. Via the rangefinder, the lens can be focused as close as 70 cm – at which point a slight haptic resistance can be felt in the focus ring, clearly communicating its position to the user. This touch of engineering is key to maintaining a similar feel and usage like all other modern M lenses, so users can still be familiar and comfortable with longstanding street photography techniques such as hyperfocal distance and “shooting from the hip.” At distances between 70 and 30 cm, when the focus ring is rotated beyond that noticeable detent, the photographer can choose to focus via the camera’s rear LCD in Live View mode, the Visoflex electronic viewfinder, or the Leica FOTOS app.

The construction of the lens hood in combination with highly effective anti-reflective glass coatings makes the APO-Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. extremely resistant to any type of stray light – allowing the photographer to shoot into the sun or other sources of light without fear of flare or ghosting. Common optical flaws such as chromatic aberration and distortion are corrected to the point of barely being noticeable. This imaging prowess and edge-to-edge contrast rendition creates an especially pronounced and lovely bokeh at open aperture. Seeing as the aperture is almost perfectly circular, owing to its eleven blades, this effect is also retained when the lens is stopped down for maximum depth-of-field.

Even more than any other M-lens, the APO-Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. only has to be stopped down for creative purposes. The rendition quality at the center and edges of the image is of such fidelity that there is no scope for further improvement by stopping down. Though many lenses of the world today augment their performance by being larger and heavier by design, the top-performing APO-Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. is both compact and lightweight. With its classic reportage focal length, this is a lens for every photographic situation that can be used on any current and future model of the M series, as well as the Leica SL2 and SL2-S. The APO-Summicron-M 35 f/2 ASPH. is available to order today at Leica Stores, Boutiques and Dealers for $8,195.00.

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


We’d never before seen so much silicon wrapped up in such a small package

Photo: Samuel Spencer

The Hasselblad X1D beat Fujifilm to the market by three months in 2016 to become the first mirrorless medium format camera. It wasn’t the first “affordable” (or, at least, sub-$10,000) medium format option: that credit goes to Pentax and its 645D and Z, but it was the first larger-than-full-frame digital camera to be designed as a self-contained ILC with no mirror.

It was built around the same 50MP CMOS sensor as the 645Z, which also underpinned the Fujifilm GFX 50 models, producing some excellent image quality. Hasselblad’s modern minimalist design was eye-catching, and the operability improved significantly through a series of firmware updates (though it never offered the mass-market slickness of the GFX models).

One of the factors that allowed the Hasselblad to be so small was the decision to build leaf shutters into all the XCD lenses, rather than having a physical shutter in the camera body. This resulted in a camera that could sync with flashes all the way up to each lens’s maximum shutter speed. Though this came at the cost both of higher lens prices and of polygonal bokeh, as the shutter/aperture mechanisms had relatively few blades. This second issue was somewhat resolved by an update that allowed the aperture to be opened a fraction beyond the widest listed value, so that the blades don’t intrude on the image.

Click here to see the nearly 200 photos we’ve published from the X1D

Alongside the X1D came the first series of medium format lenses designed specifically for 44x33mm digital, giving some excellent results (to the point that moiré is a significant risk even when stopped-down to F5.6, given the lack of low-pass filter on the X1D’s sensor). It also led to the only instance we’ve seen of a manufacturer referring to equivalent f-numbers. It’s probably no surprise that it would be one of the only companies to solely produce larger than full-frame systems.

We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless

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On this day: Hasselblad launches first medium format mirrorless


We’d never before seen so much silicon wrapped up in such a small package

Photo: Samuel Spencer

The Hasselblad X1D beat Fujifilm to the market by three months in 2016 to become the first mirrorless medium format camera. It wasn’t the first “affordable” (or, at least, sub-$10,000) medium format option: that credit goes to Pentax and its 645D and Z, but it was the first larger-than-full-frame digital camera to be designed as a self-contained ILC with no mirror.

It was built around the same 50MP CMOS sensor as the 645Z, which also underpinned the Fujifilm GFX 50 models, producing some excellent image quality. Hasselblad’s modern minimalist design was eye-catching, and the operability improved significantly through a series of firmware updates (though it never offered the mass-market slickness of the GFX models).

One of the factors that allowed the Hasselblad to be so small was the decision to build leaf shutters into all the XCD lenses, rather than having a physical shutter in the camera body. This resulted in a camera that could sync with flashes all the way up to each lens’s maximum shutter speed. Though this came at the cost both of higher lens prices and of polygonal bokeh, as the shutter/aperture mechanisms had relatively few blades. This second issue was somewhat resolved by an update that allowed the aperture to be opened a fraction beyond the widest listed value, so that the blades don’t intrude on the image.

Click here to see the nearly 200 photos we’ve published from the X1D

Alongside the X1D came the first series of medium format lenses designed specifically for 44x33mm digital, giving some excellent results (to the point that moiré is a significant risk even when stopped-down to F5.6, given the lack of low-pass filter on the X1D’s sensor). It also led to the only instance we’ve seen of a manufacturer referring to equivalent f-numbers. It’s probably no surprise that it would be one of the only companies to solely produce larger than full-frame systems.

We were in the fortunate position to borrow a Hasselblad, Pentax 645Z and Fujifilm GFX 50S at the same time and use them alongside one another, and looked at their comparative strengths and weaknesses. We hope to do something similar with the more refined 100MP cameras from Hasselblad and Fujifilm in the coming months.



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Our favorite ‘natural worlds’ pictures: DPReview Editors’ Challenge results

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Our favorite ‘natural worlds’ pictures: DPReview Editors’ Challenge results


June includes multiple days devoted to celebrating nature, including World Environment Day (June 5), World Oceans Day (June 8) and World Rainforest Day (June 22). In that spirit, we chose ‘Natural Worlds’ as the theme for our most recent Editors’ Choice photo challenge, with over 100 readers submitting entries.

We love seeing your work! Thanks to everyone who submitted. We couldn’t call out every image we liked, so we restrained ourselves to a baker’s dozen (in no particular order).

If you don’t see your work here today, don’t despair. We’ll soon announce a new Editors’ Choice challenge.

Also, a quick reminder to keep comments constructive and civil. These are images submitted by your fellow readers who took the time to share their work. Rule #1: Be nice. That’s it, there is no rule #2.



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