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New research helps solar technology become more affordable

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New research helps solar technology become more affordable

Scientists at The University of Manchester have found a way to accelerate the uptake of solar technology, by increasing the environmental safety of perovskite solar cells.

Perovskite solar cells have attracted interest because, unlike silicon solar cells, they can be mass produced through roll-to-roll processing. Additionally, they are light and colourful, with the versatility to be used in non-traditional settings such as windows and contoured roofs.

However, up until now, application has been impacted by potential environmental risks. Perovskite solar cells contain lead, a cumulative toxin, and if the cells get damaged, lead ions may leak.

Taking lessons from nature, Professor Brian Saunders and Dr David Lewis have devised a way to eliminate the lead release from broken cells. Using a bioinspired mineral called hydroxyapatite, a major constituent of human bone, they have created a ‘failsafe’ which captures the lead ions in an inorganic matrix. As a result, if cells are damaged, toxins are stored in an inert mineral, rather than released in the environment.

In a dual success, The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)-funded project found that through the addition of hydroxyapatite, the efficiency of perovskite solar cell increased to around 21%. This compares to around 18% efficiency for control cells with no added hydroxyapatite. An increased efficiency in panels means more energy can be generated and at a lower cost.

The research team hope that the cells will bring forward the large-scale application of perovskite solar cell technology. Professor Brian Saunders, Professor of Polymer and Colloid Chemistry at the School of Materials, The University of Manchester, said: “Up until now, the substantial lead component in perovskite solar cells has been a potential environmental concern. If the solar cells are damaged, for example by hail, the ions may leak.

“By creating an in-device fail-safe system, we have devised a way to contain toxic ions in damaged perovskite cells. Through increasing the inherent safety of perovskite solar cells, we hope our research will provide a helping hand to the wider deployment of solar technology as we strive to achieve net zero CO2 emissions.””

Dr David Lewis, Deputy Head of Department and Reader in Materials Chemistry, added, “We embarked on this research as we were committed to eliminating an environmental risk. That commitment has resulted in increasing both the sustainability and the efficiency of perovskite solar cells. We hope these dual outcomes will increase the viability for homes and businesses, worldwide, to host and use solar technology.”

The research was reported in: ‘Bioinspired scaffolds that sequester lead ions in physically damaged high efficiency perovskite solar cells’ in Chemical Communications.

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Solar Energy

2 solar projects to supply power for 5 military installations

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2 solar projects to supply power for 5 military installations


2 solar projects to supply power for 5 military installations

by Mike Heuer

Washington DC (UPI) Jun 18, 2024






The Department of Defense is partnering with Duke Energy to provide solar power for five military bases in North and South Carolina.

The DOD announced the power partnership with Duke Energy in which all power produced by two new Duke Energy solar energy facilities in South Carolina will power the five military bases.

The military bases are the Army’s Fort Liberty, the Marine Corps’ Camp Lejeune and Cherry Point Air Station bases, and the Seymour Johnson Air Force Base in North Carolina.

The Shaw Air Force Base in South Carolina also will obtain power from the two Duke Energy solar power plants that are under construction and expected to be operational by September 2026.

“By supporting the construction of new clean, renewable energy, we are enhancing our resilience in support of the warfighter and DOD’s mission,” Brendan Owens, the DOD’s chief sustainability officer, said in a news release Tuesday.

Owens said the two Duke Energy solar arrays will “deliver power exclusively to [the] DOD over the agreement’s 15-year term and contribute to a more reliable and resilient commercial electric grid.”

The DOD agreed to pay $248 million over 15 years to obtain an estimated 4.8 million megawatt hours of carbon-free solar energy from Duke Energy.

The federal government is the nation’s largest user of energy, and President Joe Biden in 2021 ordered federal agencies to achieve 100% carbon-free electricity usage by 2030.

Biden’s executive order requires government officials to ” support the growth of America’s clean energy industry … in ways that are good for taxpayers and communities,” said Andrew Mayock, chief sustainability officer at the White House Council on Environmental Quality.

Duke Energy recently undertook its Green Source Advantage program to provide renewable energy for the five military bases.

“As our large business customers plan for the future, they also have increasingly specific goals around decarbonization,” Duke Energy Vice-President Meghan Dewey said.

Dewey said those goal “require access to renewable energy sources that can support those needs.”

DOD officials agree.

“This project is a great opportunity to assist our military departments and our warfighters in their decarbonization goals,” Air Force Col. Jennifer Neris said.

The Army’s Assistant Secretary for Installation, Energy and Environment Rachel Jacobson said the Duke Energy partnership is “essential for delivering energy resilience for the Army.”

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Argentina starts removing solar panels from Chilean border

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Argentina starts removing solar panels from Chilean border


Argentina starts removing solar panels from Chilean border

by AFP Staff Writers

Santiago (AFP) June 17, 2024






Argentina on Monday began removing solar panels that were installed by accident on the wrong side of its shared border with Chile, after a complaint from Chilean President Gabriel Boric.

In late April, the Argentine Navy inaugurated a maritime surveillance post on the border with Chile, in the Patagonia region of South America.

But the solar panels, which provide energy to that military unit, were set up on the Chilean side of the frontier.

In a statement, the Argentine Navy acknowledged the mistake and said it had “transferred personnel and means to begin the removal of a solar panel installed in the territory of the sister republic of Chile, north of the Island of Tierra del Fuego.”

Earlier in the day, Boric demanded that the panels be removed or Chile itself would do it.

“Borders are not something that can be ambiguous. It is a basic principle of respect between countries and therefore they must remove those solar panels as soon as possible or we are going to do it,” Boric told reporters during a visit to Paris.

Chile and Argentina share a border of about 5,000 kilometers (more than 3,000 miles).

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Chinese Premier Li targets clean energy in Australia visit

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Chinese Premier Li targets clean energy in Australia visit


Chinese Premier Li targets clean energy in Australia visit

by AFP Staff Writers

Sydney (AFP) June 18, 2024






Premier Li Qiang toured a Chinese-controlled lithium refiner in Perth on Tuesday, a sign of his country’s vast appetite for Australian “critical minerals” required for clean energy technologies.

Li ended his four-day visit to Australia with a tour of the low-carbon energy industry in resource-rich Western Australia.

His first stop was Tianqi Lithium Energy Australia, a 51-percent Chinese-owned venture comprising a mine for hard rock lithium ore, and a lithium refinery.

Along with at least a dozen other officials, China’s second most powerful man donned a white helmet during a rainy visit to the facility south of Perth.

The Chinese premier will also view a private research facility for clean energy-produced “green hydrogen” — touted as a fuel of the future to power heavy-duty items such as trucks and blast furnaces.

Australia extracts 52 percent of the world’s lithium, the vast majority of it exported as an ore to China for eventual refining and use in batteries, notably in China’s world-dominant electric vehicle industry.

But despite being a huge Australian customer, China’s involvement in the country’s critical mineral industry is sensitive because of its dominance of global supply chains.

Australia has only recently begun refining lithium rather than exporting the ore.

And the government has announced a strategic plan to develop new supply chains with friendly countries for critical minerals such as lithium, nickel and so-called rare earths.

Earlier this year, the government ordered five China-linked shareholders to sell off a combined 10 percent stake in Northern Minerals, a producer of the rare earth dysprosium.

Such foreign ownership was against Australia’s “national interests”, Treasurer Jim Chalmers said.

About 99 percent of the world’s dysprosium — used in high-performance magnets — is currently produced in China.

China has invested in critical minerals in Latin America, Africa and Australia over the past 10-20 years, said Marina Zhang, associate professor at the University of Technology Sydney’s Australia-China Relations Institute.

Developing supply chains independent of China is “fine and dandy” but unlikely to be achieved even in the short to medium term, she said.

“We are facing a very time-pressing issue that is fighting against climate change — so that issue should be at the centre of the discourse,” Zhang said.

“But unfortunately the Western allies are taking the approach that China’s dominance across the supply chains of critical minerals is imposing national security threats,” she said.

China’s narrative, however, was that it was investing and making a contribution to sustainability and environmental protection, the analyst said.

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